Dragonflies of Texas: A Field Guide (Texas Natural History Guides(TM))

Dragonflies of Texas: A Field Guide (Texas Natural History Guides(TM))

Dragonflies of Texas: A Field Guide (Texas Natural History Guides(TM))

$17.69
Dragonflies of Texas: A Field Guide (Texas Natural History Guides(TM))
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            “Just published in 2015, Dragonflies of Texas is the definitive field guide to these insects in Texas. It covers all 160 species with a two-page spread for each that includes photographs of both sexes and known variations when possible, key features, a distribution map, identification, discussion of similar species, status in Texas, habitat, seasonality, and general comments. In addition to the species accounts, John Abbott discusses dragonfly anatomy, life history, conservation, names, and photography. He also provides information on species that may eventually be discovered in Texas, state and global conservation rankings, seasonality of all species in chronological order, and additional resources and publications on the identification of dragonflies”

            Review of Dragonflies of Texas: A Field Guide (Texas Natural History Guides
            March 3, 2016
            FGR Team (FieldGuideReview.com)


            Publisher’s Description:

            Dragonflies and damselflies (together known as Odonata) are among the most remarkably distinctive insects in their appearance and biology, and they have become some of the most popular creatures sought by avocational naturalists. Texas hosts 160 species of dragonflies, nearly half of the 327 species known in North America, making the state a particularly good place to observe dragonflies in their natural habitats.

            Dragonflies of Texas is the definitive field guide to these insects. It covers all 160 species with in situ photographs and detailed anatomical images as needed. Each species is given a two-page spread that includes photographs of both sexes and known variations when possible, key features, a distribution map, identification, discussion of similar species, status in Texas, habitat, seasonality, and general comments. Many of the groups also have comparative plates that show anatomically distinctive characteristics. In addition to the species accounts, John Abbott discusses dragonfly anatomy, life history, conservation, names, and photography. He also provides information on species that may eventually be discovered in Texas, state and global conservation rankings, seasonality of all species in chronological order, and additional resources and publications on the identification of dragonflies.

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